1989年~2000年

1989

(A)

Acquiring a knowledge of history is a pleasant and safe pastime for the amateur.

歴史の知識を得ることは、素人には楽しく安心できる気晴らしである。

Developing an understanding of history is essential for those who would influence the future.

歴史の理解を深めることは、未来に影響を及ぼす人たちには不可欠である。

It is not only on the lessons that history has to teach, valuable though they are, that this claim lies.

このように主張するのは、歴史には教えるべき教訓があるから(これも貴重ではあるが)というだけではない。

It is rather because history, by making us aware how we arrived where we are today, gives us our bearings so that, like any traveler, we may venture into the unknown confident at least of our direction.

むしろ歴史が、我々がどのようにして今日の状態にたどりついたのかを意識させることにより、どんな旅人もそうであるように、少なくとも自分の進む方向に自信をもって敢えて未知のものに入っていけるように指針を教えてくれるからである。

When we meet the future by reacting to the present, how we react is largely determined by the past ―― our history.

我々が現在に対して振る舞うことにより未来に対処する(未来に備える)場合、どのように振る舞うかは主に過去、すなわち我々の歴史によって決定される。

 

(B)

When new fields of scientific activity first take form they begin, almost necessarily, with things and ideas that are part of the common experience of all men.

科学的活動の新分野が初めて形をなすとき、ほぼ必然的に、すべての人間が共通して経験する物事や考えから始まる。

During this early period of growth the new science is widely intelligible, and the discoveries it makes can be understood, argued, resisted, supported, or ridiculed by millions of people.

この発達の初期の間、新しい科学は非常に分かりやすく、それによる発見は何百万もの人々に理解され、議論され、抵抗され、支持され、嘲笑されることもある。

At a later stage the science may become more precise, may achieve deeper understanding or soar to greater intellectual heights, but it will never again have the same impact on the average man’s view of himself and the world around him.

後の段階になればなるほど科学はより正確になったり、より深く理解されたり、またはより高い知的水準に達するかもしれないが、そのような科学が平均的な人間が自分をどう見るか、周りの世界をどう見るかに対して当初と同じような衝撃を与えることは二度とないだろう。

 

1990

(A)

In the age of abundance, the apparent availability of virtually all material necessities tended to lead people to expect speedy gratification of their desires and to have little sense of the length of time over which people in other times and places had had to wait in order to have some of their more basic material needs satisfied.

物が溢れている時代には、物質的な必需品がほとんどすべて手に入りそうに思えるため、人々は自分の欲望がすぐに満たされると期待し、時代と場所を異にする人々はもっと基本的に必要な物を満たすためには長い間待たなければならないことをほとんど感じない傾向があった。

 

(B)

The people that Butcher (アメリカの写真家) photographed were intensely aware of the ability of the photograph to freeze time and, in a sense, provide immortality.

ブッチャーに写真を撮られた人々は、時間を止め、ある意味で永遠を感じさせる写真の力を強く感じていた。

In a number of his pictures, people hold photographs to replace deceased or absent family members.

彼の多くの写真の中で人々は亡くなったりその場にいない家族の代わりにするために写真を手に持っている。

In such cases photographs ascend to the status of a real person.

そのような場合、写真は現実の人間の地位にまで上りつめる。

It is perhaps because of this respect for the image that people were seldom photographed in less than their best clothing.

人々が最高の服装以外の恰好で撮られることがめったになかったのは、おそらく画像に対してこのような敬意が払われたためだろう。

In fact, there are records of family members’ being excluded from family photographs because they did not own proper attire.

実際、家族の一員でありながら、まともな服がないという理由で家族写真に入れてもらえなかったという記録が残っている。

 

1991 (A)

Only the smallest fraction of the human race has ever acquired the habit of taking an objective view of the past.

過去を客観的に見る習慣が身についているのは人類の中でほんの一握りの人たちだけである。

For most people, even most educated people, the past is merely a prologue to the present, not merely without interest in so far as it is independent of the present, but simply inconceivable except in terms of the present.

たいていの人々、たいていの教養がある人にとっても過去は現在への序章にすぎない。つまり、単に現在と関係がない限り関心がないというだけでなく、現在という観点からしか全く考えられないのである。

The events of our own past life are remembered, not as they seemed to us at the time, but merely as incidents leading up to our present situation.

我々自身の過去の生活の中で起こった出来事を思い出すのは、当時我々の心に映ったように思い出すのではなく、我々が現在置かれた状況を導く出来事としてのみ思い出されるにすぎない。

We cannot persuade ourselves ―― in fact, we make no attempt to do so ―― that undertakings which ended in failure were entered upon with just as much forethought and optimism as those which have profoundly affected our lives.

失敗に終わった仕事が、我々の人生に深く影響した仕事と全く同じだけの見通しと楽観をもって開始したことを自分自身に納得させることはできないし、実際にそうしようとも思わない。

 

(B)

The picture postcard was divided into six small sections.

その絵葉書は6つの小さな部分に分けられていた。

There were views of the beach, the promenade, the bowling green, the pier, the flower-gardens and the war memorial.

砂浜、散歩道、ローン・ボーリング用の芝生、桟橋、花園、戦争記念碑の景色が写っていた。

In the middle, inscribed in capital letters, was the name WORTHING(イングランド南部の保養地).

中央には大文字でWORTHINGという地名が記されていた。

The photographs, in smudgy black and white, appeared to have been taken before the war.

それはぼやけた白黒写真で、戦前に撮られたようだった。

It was an ugly card ―― the fussy little segments distracted and repelled the eye ―― but Henry could mentally trace the motives behind its purchase with perfect confidence, for it was just the sort of card he had bought himself in past years to send to friends or relatives.

見苦しい絵葉書だった。小さく区切られた部分が飾り立てられ、思わず目をそむけ見る気をなくさせるようなものだった。しかし、ヘンリーは心の中で完全な自信をもってそれを買いたくなる理由を突き止めることができた。なぜなら、それはまさに彼自身がかつて友達や身内に送るために買った類の絵葉書だったからだ。

Six pictures for the price of one was good value for money and eliminated the problem of choice.

一枚の値段で6枚の写真というのはお買い得だったので、あれこれ選ぶ面倒もなかった。

 

1992  (A)

What is new to our time is the realization that, acting quite independently of any good or evil intentions of ours, the human enterprise as a whole has begun to strain and eat away at the natural terrestrial world on which human and other life depends.

我々の時代になって初めて認識したことは、我々のいかなる善意や悪意とも全く無関係に作用しながら、全体としての人間の営みが人間や他の生物が依存している地球上の自然界を痛めつけ、浸食し始めているということである。

Taken in its entirety, the increase in mankind’s strength has brought about a decisive, many-sided shift in the balance of strength between man and the earth.

全体として捉えると、人類の力が強まったために人間と地球の力関係に決定的で多方面にわたる変化が生じた。

Nature, once a harsh and feared master, now lies in subjection, and needs protection against man’s powers.

自然は、かつては厳しく恐ろしい主人であったが、今や隷属の身となり、人間の力から保護される必要がある。

Yet because man, no matter what intellectual and technical heights he may attain, remains embedded in nature, the balance has shifted against him, too, and the threat that he presents to the earth is a threat to himself as well.

とはいえ、人間がどれほど知性や技術の面で高いレベルに達しても自然の一部であることに変わりはないので、この力関係は人間にも不利なように変化し、人間が地球に及ぼす脅威は人間自身にも脅威となっている。

 

(B)

Philosophers love posing dilemmas.

哲学者はジレンマ(二者択一の板ばさみ状態)をもちかけるのが好きである。

Here’s one.

一例を挙げよう。

You’re standing in the National Gallery at the opening of an art exhibition.

今、ある美術展の初日に国立美術館の中で立っている。

Suddenly a fire breaks out and spreads with enormous speed.

突然火事が起こって火が物凄い速度で広がる。

In front of you is a priceless Leonardo.

目の前には値のつけられないような貴重なレオナルド・ダビンチの絵が掛かっている。

To your right is one of the country’s most respected elder statesmen.

右手には国内で最も尊敬されている高齢の政治家の一人がいる。

To your left is your four-year-old daughter.

左手には4歳になる自分の娘がいる。

You can only rescue one of them.

このうち一人または一つしか救えない。

Which do you save?

どれを救うか。

Well, if you emerged into the open air with the painting or the statesman, you might have contributed to the greater good.

さて、もし絵か政治家とともに外に出たらあなたはより大きな利益に貢献したかもしれない。

But I wonder whether we would altogether trust you as a human being.

しかし我々はあなたを人間として完全に信用するだろうか。

Somehow, the family goes to the heart of our sense of moral obligation.

どういうわけか家族というものは我々の道徳的な義務感の核心に触れる。

Our ties to our children and to our parents are fundamental; and not the result of any rule or reflection.

我々と子供や親との絆は根本的なものであり、何らかの規則や熟慮の結果ではない。

Rather, they have to do with who we are and our peculiar relationship with those who brought us into the world and those we have brought into being in turn.

むしろその絆は自分が何者であるか、そして自分をこの世に生んでくれた人たちや逆に我々がこの世に生み出した人たちとの特別な関係と関わりがある。

We would be inclined to say it is an instinct, a natural feeling.

我々はそれが本能すなわち生まれつきの感情であるとつい言いたくなるかもしれない。

But it is also a matter of culture, of acquired values.

しかし、それはまた文化という後天的な価値観の問題でもあるのだ。

 

1993(A)

New techniques used in film-making have made movies more vividly lifelike in recent years and further developments may make it possible to copy reality still more closely.

映画製作に使われる新技術により最近は映画がより生き生きと真に迫ったものになり、さらに発展すれば現実をよりいっそうそっくりに写すこともできるだろう。

Even so, there will always be a distinct difference between experience of the real world and the experience in the cinema.

たとえそうなっても、現実世界の体験と映画の中での体験との間にははっきりとした違いが常にある。

Perception of reality is an active process whereas our activity while watching a movie is strictly limited.

現実を認識することが積極的な過程であるのに対し、映画を見ている間の我々の活動は全く制約されている。

What we see in the real world is the product of our own will and choice.

我々が現実世界で見るものは自分の意志と選択の結果である。

In the cinema we have to accept the point of view given to us.

映画の場合、我々は与えられた観点を受け入れる必要がある。

The making of a film requires the choice of a viewpoint which controls what is shown on the screen, thus limiting our normal freedom to survey what is in front of us, to select and examine what catches our attention or interest.

映画製作のためにはスクリーンに映されるものを統制する観点を選択する必要があり、そのため目の前にあるものを見渡し、我々の注意や関心を引くものを選び出し吟味する通常の自由を制約する。

We can watch. We can listen. We cannot investigate for ourselves.

我々は見ることも聴くこともできる。しかし自分で詳しく調べることはできない。

 

(B)

For only a tiny fragment of human history has man been aware even that he had a history.

人間に歴史があることさえ知るようになったのは人間の歴史の中でごく最近のことである。

During nearly all the years since man first developed writing and civilization began, he thought of himself and of his community in ways quite different from those familiar to us today.

人間が最初に文字を作り出し文明が始まってからほとんどの間、人間は自身と社会のことを今日我々に馴染みがある考えとは全く違うように考えていた。

He tended to see the passage of time, not as a series of unique, irreversible moments of change, but rather as a continuous repetition of familiar moments.

人間は時間の経過を、ただ一度の取り戻せない変化の瞬間の連続ではなく、むしろ馴染み深い瞬間が絶えず繰り返されたものと見る傾向があった。

The cycle of the seasons ―― spring, summer, fall, winter, spring ―― was for him the most vivid, most intimate sign of passing time.

春、夏、秋、冬、春とめぐる季節が人間にとって最も生き生きと身近に時間の経過を感じさせてくれるものだった。

 

1994(A)

There can be no human society without conflict: such a society would be a society not of friends but of ants.

争いのない人間社会などありえない。そのような社会があるとすれば同胞の社会ではなくアリの社会である。

Even if it were attainable, there are human values of the greatest importance which would be destroyed by its attainment, and which therefore should prevent us from attempting to bring it about.

たとえ争いのない社会が実現可能であっても、それが達成されると破壊され、それゆえ我々はそのような社会を実現しようとしなくなる最高に重要な価値が人間にはある。

On the other hand, we certainly ought to bring about a reduction of conflict.

一方で、争いを減らすべきであるのも確かである。

So already we have here an example of a clash of values or principles.

だから我々の目の前には既に価値観や原則の衝突の一例がある。

This example also shows that clashes of values and principles may be valuable, and indeed essential for an open society.

この例からはまた価値観と原則の衝突は開かれた社会には貴重であり、本当に必要不可欠なものかもしれないことが分かる。

 

(B)

The huge blue heron glides over our cottage roof and settles down gently, taking up his post at the mouth of the tidal cove.

巨大なアオサギが我々の別荘の屋根を飛び越え静かに止まると、潮の引いた入り江の口で持ち場につく。

Standing guard on elegant long legs, he picks off trespassers who swim too close to the border.

優雅な長い脚で見張りに立ち、自分のなわばりの近くまで泳いでくる侵入者を嘴で狙い撃ちにする。

When he is through and the water begins to intrude again, he takes off, arcing out over the bay.

餌を食べ終え、潮が満ち始めると、アオサギは飛び立ち、入り江の上空に弧を描く。

Every day since we arrived, the great bird has followed this pattern.

我々が到着してから毎日、その大きな鳥はこの行動を繰り返している。

He arrives at each low tide like clockwork ―― no, nothing like clockwork.

潮が引くたびに時計仕掛けのようにやってくる。いや、時計仕掛けとは全く違う。

Watching him at my own porch post, I cannot imagine anything more different than tides and clocks, any way of life more different than one in tune with tides and another regimented by numbers.

ポーチの柱でその鳥を見ていると、私は潮の干満と時計ほど異なったものを想像できない。潮の干満と調和した生き方と数字によって規格化された生き方ほど異なった生き方を想像できないのだ。

The heron belongs to a world of creatures who follow a natural course; I belong to a world of creatures who have fractured continuity into quarter hours and seconds, who try to mechanically impose our will even on day and night.

サギは自然の摂理に従う生き物の世界に属している。私は連続した時の流れを15分、秒単位に切り刻み、昼や夜さえ機械的に自分の意志を押しつけようとする生き物の世界に属している。

But each year I come here, vacating a culture of fractions and entering one of rhythms.

しかし、私は毎年ここに来て、細切れの文化から退き、リズムがある文化に入る。

Like many of us, I need a special place, just to find my own place, my own naturalness.

多くの人と同様、私はただ自分の場所、自身が自然体でいられる場所を見つけるためには特別な場所が必要である。

 

1995

There is an extremely powerful conceptual connection between our idea of mind and our idea of writing.

「思考」という概念と「執筆」という概念の間には極めて強力な認識上のつながりがある。

Records are understood as a sort of external memory, and memory as internal records.

記録は一種の外部的記憶と解され、記憶は内部的記録と解される。

Writing is understood as thinking on paper, and thought as writing in the mind.

執筆は紙の上の思考と解され、思想は思考中の執筆と解される。

By means of this conceptual connection, the written work is taken as a substitute for or even as the essence of the author; the author’s mind is an endless paper on which he or she writes, making mind internal writing; and the book the author writes is external mind, the external form of that writing.

この認識上のつながりによって、書かれた作品は著者の代理または著者の本質とさえ受け取られる。著者の思考は終わりなき紙であり、そこに著者が書き、思考を内部的著作にする。著者が書く本は外部的思考、すなわちその著作が外部に表れた形態である。

The writing is therefore conceived of as having a voice, one that speaks to us, and to which we respond.

執筆はそれゆえ声を持っていると考えられる。それは我々に話しかけ、我々が反応する声である。

The author is understood as the self thinking.

著者は思考する自我であると解される。

The self is understood as an author writing in the mind.

その自我は思考中に執筆している著者と解される。

Sometimes, the self is an author writing thoughts externally on paper.

その自我が外に向かって思想を紙に書いている著者である場合もある。

This makes it extremely easy for us to talk about “putting our thoughts down on paper” and to see the author’s self as contained in the writing.

これにより我々は「思想を紙に書き記すこと」について語り、著者の自我が著作の中に含まれると考えることが極めて容易になる。

This makes the everyday reference to writing by its author’s name ―― as in “Pascal is on the top shelf” ―― seem so natural.

これにより「パスカルは一番上の棚にあるよ」と言うように、日常的に書物を著者の名前で呼ぶことがごく自然に思える。

 

1996(A)

Four and a half billion years ago, the earth was formed.

45億年前に地球が形成された。

Perhaps a half billion years after that, life arose on the planet.

おそらくそれから5億年後にこの惑星に生命が誕生した。

For the next four billion years, life became steadily more complex, more varied, and more ingenious, until, around a million years ago, it produced mankind ―― the most complex and ingenious species of them all.

次の40億年間、生命は着実により複雑になり、より多様化し、より賢くなり、ついに約100万年前に人類、すなわちあらゆる生命の中で最も複雑で賢い種が生まれた。

Only six or seven thousand years ago ―― a period that is to the history of the earth as less than a minute is to a year ―― civilization emerged, enabling us to build up a human world, and to add to the marvels of evolution marvels of our own: marvels of art, of science, of social organization, of spiritual attainment.

ほんの6~7千年前(この期間は地球の歴史を1年にたとえれば1分にも満たないが)、文明が起こり、それにより我々が人間世界を築けるようになり、さらに進化という驚異に、我々自身の驚異、すなわち芸術、科学、社会組織、精神的達成という驚異を加えることができるようになった。

 

(B)

If, as I intend, I go on living in New Mexico, I suppose I shall know it far better than I do now, but I suppose I shall never again see it as clearly as during my first year.

私が予定しているように、このままニューメキシコに住み続ければこの地のことが今より遥かによく分かるだろうが、最初の年ほどはっきりこの地が分かることは絶対にないだろう。

And what is there about this land which sets travelers to altering their schedules and overstaying?

それにしても、この土地の何が旅行者に予定を変更させて長居をさせるのか。

What is there, more forcefully still, that has seized upon astonishing numbers of people who came to look, and then put down their luggage and remained?

さらにもっと強く、驚くほど多くの観光客の心をとらえ、荷物を下ろさせ留まらせたものは何か。

As it has upon me.

私をとらえたように。

I had no intention of living here.

私はこの地に暮らすつもりは全くなかった。

When in late August we drove through a hurricane out of our Connecticut village ―― my wife, three of my children, with eleven pieces of lightweight baggage, and trustful that though New London (コネチカット州の町の名前)was flooded we might get a train in Hartford(コネチカット州の町の名前) ―― we were leaving for a year.

8月の終わりにハリケーンの中を故郷のコネチカットの村から車で通り抜けたとき(妻と3人の子供と共に11個の軽い荷物を持って、ニューロンドンは洪水に遭ったがハートフォードで列車に乗れると信じて)、我々は1年間離れるつもりだった。

I had lived all my more than forty years in New England, I wanted a change, and I wanted to see the Southwest.

私は40年を超える間ずっとニューイングランドで暮らした結果、変化を求めるようになり、南西部を見たくなったのである。

 

1997(A)

Why do mothers instinctively hold babies on their left side?

なぜ母親は赤ん坊を本能的に体の左側で抱くのか。

One theory was that it was a matter of convenience ―― mothers need their right hand free to feed the baby.

一説によると、その方が便利だから、つまり母親は赤ん坊に授乳するために右手をあけておく必要があるということだった。

Others thought it had something to do with the greater sensitivity of the left breast.

また、左胸の方が敏感だということと何らかの関係があると考える人もいた。

But now, says a medical magazine, doctors have found the answer: mothers cradle on the left because it leaves the baby’s left ear exposed.

しかし今は、ある医学雑誌によると、医師には答が分かっている。母親が左側で赤ん坊をあやすのは、赤ん坊の左耳を露出させるためだというのである。

The left ear feeds information to the right side of the baby’s brain, the side which interprets the melody and emotional sound quality of the mother’s voice.

左耳は赤ん坊の脳の右側に情報を送るが,これは母親の声の調べや情緒的な音質を解釈する側なのである。

 

(B)

Home is where the heart is.

家は心の居場所である。

But at the same time, home is so sad.

しかし同時に家はとても悲しい。

Bland’s attitude towards his flat was the somewhat shifting point at which these two attitudes met.

自分のアパートに対するブランダの思いは、この二つの思いが出会って少し変化する点であった。

When he was away from it he thought of it longingly, as the place which would always provide him with a refuge from the world.

家を離れているときには家のことを、世間からの逃げ場をいつも提供してくれる場所として恋しく思い浮かべた。

When he was actually inside it, safe and warm and quiet, as he had always wished to be, it irritated him, precisely on account of those same qualities for which he had felt such intense nostalgia.

実際に家の中にいて、常にそうありたいと願っていたように安全で暖かく静かになると苛立ちを覚えたが、それはまさしく彼があれほど強く郷愁を感じていたのと同じ性質のせいだった。

The quietness, which he cherished, tormented him. There seemed to be no way in which he could resolve the conflict between these feelings.

心の中で大切にしていた静けさが彼を苦しめた。このような感情の対立を解決できる方法はなさそうだった。

 

1998

(A)

Reading is not a passive act. Good writing of any kind will invite you to participate, engaging your senses, emotions, imaginations, and intellect. It will trigger your own memories and associations, and it will stimulate your thinking. When you read, you absorb, evaluate, and extend what the writer has articulated, interpreting it in light of who you are and what you know. In this sense, when you read a work of literature, you recreate it.

読書は受動的な行為ではない。良書というものはどんな種類のものでも、読者の五感や感情、想像力、知性に訴えて作品に参加するように誘うものである。良書は読者自身の記憶や連想を呼び起こし、思考を刺激するのである。読書をするとき、著者が明確に述べていることを吸収し、評価し、拡張して、それを自分の人格・知識に照らして解釈する。この意味で、文学作品を読むとき、読者はそれを再び創造しているのである。

 

(B)

Human cultures evolve differently under varying circumstances, just as biological systems do. From one culture to another, different attitudes about human relationships with nature ―― about the degree to which human beings are part of or separate from nature ―― prevail, and different assumptions arise concerning the roles human beings play in the natural order.

人間の文化はちょうど生物の仕組みと同様に様々な状況の下でそれぞれ異なる進化を遂げる。文化が異なれば、人間と自然との関係について、すなわち人間がどの程度まで自然の一部なのか、あるいはどの程度まで自然と別個の存在なのかについて、様々に異なる考え方が広まり、また人間が自然の秩序の中で果たす役割に関して異なった考えが生ずる。

 

1999

(A)

A prudent employer would take the time to analyze the incentives workers might list as their reasons for working ―― and most importantly, the order in which they list them. A recent study disclosed that money was number seven on such a list. Topping it was satisfaction in performing the job. Obviously, that good feeling one gets from having accomplished something is still the best reward for hard labor. But workers also need to know they are doing their job well, and the major deficiency within management today is the failure of telling them so.

分別のある雇い主ならば従業員が働く理由としてリストに挙げそうな動機を、また重要なことに従業員がそれらの動機をどの順序で挙げるか、時間をかけて分析するだろう。最近の研究は、金銭はこのようなリストの7番目であると明らかにした。リストの筆頭に挙がったのは仕事をする際の満足感であった。明らかに何かを成し遂げたことから得られるあの気持ちよさは今もなお重労働に対する最大の報酬なのだ。いやそれだけでなく従業員はまた自分が立派に仕事をしていることを知る必要があり、今日の経営陣に最も不足しているのは従業員にそのことを伝えていないことである。

 

(B)

It is good when someone speaks out about an issue that troubles a group, because then it can ―― must ―― be faced. I know from experience that the habit of avoiding controversy can in the end cause far more trouble than it avoids, because strong feelings, unexpressed, don’t die but build up. They can accumulate other resentments that might otherwise be unimportant. In the end, if we are not to be possessed by hidden ill-feeling, we have to listen to one another.

ある集団を困らせている問題について誰かが思い切って発言するのはよいことだ。そうすればその問題に直面することができる、いや直面せざるを得ないからだ。いつも論争を避けていると結局は論争すれば避けられるよりもはるかに面倒な事態が生じるおそれがあることを私は経験から知っている。なぜなら、強い感情は口に出さないでいると、消えるのではなくかえって増幅するからだ。そのような感情は口に出しておけば大したことではなかったかもしれない他の恨みまで蓄積することがある。結局、隠された悪感情に取りつかれたくなければ、互いの言い分を聴く必要がある。

 

2000

(A)

The mass media, printed and broadcast, are probably the most pervasive influence on attitudes and opinions in the modern world. Access to mass media is, in fact, one of the defining characteristics of modernity. Other, more powerful forces may exist within a given region or culture. On a global basis, however, in terms of sheer numbers reached, other forms of communication cannot compete with the words and pictures carried in newspapers, broadcasts, magazines, and advertising. For example, the ways women are presented in the mass media strongly affect people’s notions on women’s place, as it is and as it ought to be.

印刷物であれ放送であれ、マス・メディアは現代の世界における行動や意見に最も広く影響力をもつものであろう。実際、マス・メディアの利用は現代をはっきり示す特徴の一つである。特定の地域や文化の中では他にもっと強い影響力を及ぼすものが存在するかもしれない。しかしながら、世界に目を向け、情報が伝わる人の数そのものから判断すると、それ以外の情報伝達手段は新聞・放送・雑誌・広告に掲載されることばや写真に敵わない。例えば、女性がマス・メディアでどのように扱われるかが、人々が女性の地位の現状と理想像をどう考えるかに強い影響を及ぼす。

 

(B)

Any grouping of human beings has its own world; a certain range of knowledge and certain modes of evaluation. Such a worldview is subject to constant modification as time rolls on. Nor can its association with the particular grouping prevent it from being adopted, to a greater or a lesser extent, by members of some other grouping. On the contrary, information, tastes, habits, modes of feeling and judgment can be transmitted from one sociocultural grouping to another, and individuals can in any case have loyalties to more than one grouping, so that they themselves are mobile between different worldviews accordingly.

人間をどのようにグループ分けしようともそれぞれ独自の世界、すなわち知識の範囲や評価方式に独自性がある。そのような世界観は時間の経過とともに常に変化を余儀なくされる。世界観が特定の集団と結びついているからといって、多かれ少なかれ、他の集団にいる人々からその世界観の受け入れを拒否されることはありえない。それどころか、情報や嗜好、習慣、物事の感じ方や判断の仕方はある社会文化集団から別の社会文化集団へと伝えられることがあり、また個人はどんな場合でも二つ以上の集団に忠誠を誓うことができる。そのため個人自身は異なる世界観の間を適宜移動できるのである。

Follow me!

コメントを残す

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

前の記事

浜松医科大学2020年第2問

次の記事

2001年~2010年