東大全訳問題と解答

1

Creative thinking may well mean simply the realization that there’s no particular virtue in doing things the way they have always been done.

創造的思考とは、物事をいつもしているようにすることには特に何の利点もないことに気付くにすぎないと言えよう。

2

Chance had been our ally too often.

我々はあまりにも運に恵まれた。

We had grown complacent, over-confident of its loyalty.

その忠誠に満足して過信するようになった。

And so the moment when it first chose to betray us was also the moment when we were least likely to suspect that it might.

そのため初めて運に見放されようとした瞬間は、まさかそんなことになろうとは夢にも思わなかった瞬間でもあった。

3

One of the biggest problems with modern computers is that they follow all commands mechanically.

現代のコンピュータに関する最大の問題の一つは、あらゆる命令に機械的に従う点である。

Computers do what they are told to do, whether we meant it or not.

コンピュータは我々の意図とは無関係に命じられた通り実行する。

Moreover, they cannot turn themselves on, nor can they ever begin something entirely new on their own.

さらにコンピュータは自分でスイッチを入れることも、何か全く新しいことを自分で始めることもできない。

4

Before the sun was full up I went out into the yard and I was shocked to see Ritchie still squatting there reading in the flowerbed; I walked over and spoke to him.

太陽が真上に来る前に私は庭に出ると、リッチーがまだそこにしゃがんで花壇の中で本を読んでいてショックを受けた。私はそこまで行って話しかけた。

But he didn’t so much as take his eyes off the book to look at me; you’d have thought he didn’t hear me.

しかし、彼は本から目をはなして私をみることさえしなかった。(その場にいたら誰でも)私の声が聞こえなかったのだと思っただろう。

5

To the average Englishman of today Captain Cook is little more than a name.

今日の平均的なイギリス人にとってキャプテン・クックは単に名前だけの存在にすぎない。

But he is at least that, and, if we except Christopher Columbus and the latest newspaper-hero, there is hardly any other explorer of whom as much can confidently be said.

しかし、少なくともそうだということであり、クリストファー・コロンブスや新聞を飾るスターを除けば、探検家の中で自信をもって語られるのがこれほど多い人は他にはほとんど見当たらない。

6

Our relation to the books we come across in our lives is a mysterious one.

人生で出会う本との関係は不思議なものだ。

Some we fall in love with because they said the right things at the right time; others are lost to us forever because we were not ready for them when they crossed our paths and chance does not bring us into contact with them a second time.

ぴったりの時期にぴったりのことを言ってくれるという理由で大好きになる本もあれば、出会いのときには心の準備が整っていなくて偶然もう一度出会うこともなかったために永遠に縁が切れる本もある。

7

It is a well-known fact that the same things are not funny to everybody.

よく知られたことであるが、誰もが同じことをおかしいと思うとは限らない。

We have all at some time made what we consider to be a witty remark at the wrong time and in the wrong company and have consequently had to suffer severe embarrassment to find the joke falls flat.

我々はみんな、いつか場違いなときに場違いな人達に思い込みで気が利いているような発言をして、その結果、飛ばしたしゃれが全く受けず、ひどく恥ずかしい思いをせずには済まなかったことがあるものだ。

Unspoken rules govern where, when and with whom it is permissible to joke.

暗黙の了解というものがあって、どこでいつ誰になら冗談を言って差し支えないかが決まっているのである。

8

Even now, when interviewing a candidate for a job, we are inclined to attach too much weight to the school and university background and to the academic record.

現在でさえ、就職の面接をするとき、高校や大学の学歴や学業成績を重視しすぎるきらいがある。

 

We would rather accept this evidence than take the more difficult step of trying to find out for ourselves what the applicant is really like and what is the potential.

我々は志願者が実はどのような人物であり、どんな潜在的能力を持っているかを自分自身で見出そうという、より困難な方法を取るよりも、こうした証拠を受け入れる方を好む。

10

People forget how important it is to be lazy in libraries.

図書館では怠惰がどんなに大切かを人々は忘れている。

Not of course idle: idleness means daydreaming.

もちろん無為ではない。無為は、夢想のことである。

Laziness means reading the books one ought not to be reading, and becoming so absorbed in them that at the end of the day you still have most of the reading to do that you had before you that morning. Creative laziness broadens the mind.

怠惰というのは、読まなくてよい本を読んでいて、それに夢中になって、その日の終わりにも、朝方これから読まなければならなかった書物の大半がそのままになっているということである。創造的な怠惰は視野を広げる。

11

To his mother Rachel had always seemed the least probably of Gregory’s girlfriends.

グレゴリーの母には、レイチェルは息子のガールフレンドの中で一番うまくいきそうもない娘のようにいつも思われた。

He was passive by nature, and felt little trace of himself on the world.

グレゴリーは生まれつき消極的で、世の中で目立つことはほとんどなかった。

Rachel was small and fierce.

レイチェルは小柄で気性が激しかった。

She not only knew her own mind, she knew other people’s as well, especially Gregory’s.

グレゴリーの母は、正反対同士は引き合うのがという話を聞いたことがあったが、やはり2人の関係が長続きするとは思っていなかった。

His mother had heard about the attraction of opposites, but still did not give the relationship long.

彼女は自分自身の心がはっきり分かっているばかりか、他人の、特にグレゴリーの考えることもよく分かった。

12

Who ever reads a newspaper from cover to cover?

新聞を最初から最後まで読む人がいるか。

Clearly almost nobody.

ほとんどいないのが明らかである。

There isn’t time in a busy day, and not all the articles are equally interesting.

忙しい一日には時間がないし、すべての記事が同じだけ面白いわけでもない。

All readers have their own personal tastes and purposes for reading, which cause them to turn immediately to whichever sections interest them, and to ignore the rest.

読者はみんな自分なりの好みや目的があって読むのであり、そのため自分にとって興味がある紙面であればどこであれ、そこへすぐ向かい、残りは無視することになる。

Thus, most of the paper remains unread, yet you still have to buy all of it.

こうして新聞のほとんどは読まれないままになるが、やはりそれを全部買わなければならないのである。

13

What are rights?

権利とは何か。

If you ask ordinary people what exactly a right is, they’ll probably be at a loss, and won’t be able to give a clear answer.

権利とは正確には何かを普通の人に尋ねれば、彼らはおそらく困惑してしまい、明確な答えを出すことはできないだろう。

They may know what it is to violate someone’s rights.

誰かの権利を侵害するのはどのようなことかは分かるかもしれない。

They may also know what it is to have their own right to this or that denied or ignored by others.

また何らかの自分の権利を他人から否認されたり、無視されたりするのがどのようなことかも分かるかもしれない。

But what exactly is it that is being violated or wrongly denied?

しかし、侵害されたり誤って否認されたりしているのは正確には何なのか。

Is it something you acquire or something you inherit at birth?

それは何か後天的に獲得するものなのか、それとも誕生時に受け継ぐものか。

14

Most of us feel intuitively that time goes on forever of its own accord, completely unaffected by anything else, so that if all activity were suddenly to cease time would still continue without any interruption.

我々のほとんどが直感的に感じているように、時間は永遠にひとりでに流れ他の何ものにも影響されず、その結果あらゆる活動が突然止まっても、時間は依然として途切れることなく続いていく。

For many people the way in which we measure time by the clock and the calendar is absolute, and by some it has even been thought that to tamper with either was to court disaster.

多くの人にとって時計と暦によって時間を計る方法は絶対であるが、中には勝手にいずれかをいじったことで天災が起こったと考える人もいる。

15

The first “telephone” in Monroe county, Missouri, was installed in 1876 by Dr. Fred M. Moss, a local physician.

ミズーリ州モンロー郡の最初の「電話」は、1876年、地元のフレッド・M・モス医師が設置した。

One end of the wire was in his home, the other end down in the drug store four blocks away.

電話線の一方の端は彼の家に、他方の端は4ブロック離れた薬局にあった。

The service was very unsatisfactory.

その電話は全く役に立たなかった。

In fact, the telephone was more of a nuisance than otherwise until local people had satisfied their curiosity by making unprofessional calls.

実はその電話は迷惑以外の何ものでもなかった。地元の人々が医療とは無関係の通話をして好奇心を満足するまでは。

16

John, now in his second year at college, was home for the spring vacation, and his mother took the opportunity of having a serious talk with him.

ジョンは今大学2年であるが、春休みに帰省して母親はこの機会を利用して息子と真剣に話し合った。

Did he know where he wanted to live?

どこで暮らしたいのか決めてるの?

John was not sure.

ジョンは分からないと言う。

Did he know what he wanted to do?

何をしたいか分かっているの?

He was equally uncertain, but when pressed remarked that he should prefer to be quite free of any profession. She was not shocked, but went on sewing for a few minutes.

彼は同じように分からないと言ったが、答えを求められると自分は全くどの仕事にもつきたくないと言った。母親はショックを受けず、数分間裁縫を続けた。

17

We all agree that the aim of education is to fit the child for life; however, there are as many opinions as to how that fitting is to be done as there are men to hold them.

教育のねらいは子供を人生に適応できるようにすることだという意見にみんな賛成する。しかし、その適応をどうすべきかに関する意見は、意見を持つ人と同じだけ存在する。

For example, fully half of our teachers cannot see that imagination is the root of all civilization.

例えば、想像力はすべての文明の基礎であることが分からない教師は優に半数にのぼる。

Like love, imagination may very fairly be said to ‘make the world go round,’ but, as it works out of sight, it is given very little credit for what it performs.

愛と同様、想像力は「世界を動かす」と言われて至極当然であるが、それは目に見えないところで機能しているためにそれが果たす功績はほとんど認められていない。

It’s love that makes the world go round.「世界を動かすのは愛だ」(諺)

give A credit for B「AにBの功績を認める」

18

Between historical events and the historian there is a constant interplay.

歴史的事件と歴史家との間には一定の相互作用がある。

The historian tries to impose on these events some kind of rational pattern: how they happened and even why they happened.

歴史家はこのような出来事をある種の合理的なパターンに無理に当てはめようとする。どのようにして起こったのか、なぜ起こったのかというパターンである。

No historian starts with a blank mind as a jury is supposed to do.

陪審員に求められるような、まっさらな心で臨む歴史家はいない。

He does not go to documents with a childlike innocence of mind and wait patiently until they dictate conclusions to him.

歴史家は子供のような純真な心で文書に当たり、文書から結論が引き出されるまで辛抱強く待つことはない。

Quite the contrary.

全くその逆である。

19

“We can’t hang around any longer. Do you remember the short cut?” asked Charlotte, coming out of the shop.

「もう待ってられないわ。近道を覚えてる?」とシャーロットは尋ねながら店から出てきた。

 

“I should hope so ―― I’ve used it often enough.”

「そう願うね。何度も使ったんだから。」

They set off briskly, Nicholas, who hoped he knew the way, in the lead, constantly changing the parcel from one arm to the other. Charlotte had to run to keep up with him.

二人は元気よく出発し、ニコラスは道を思い出せると願って先に立ちずっと包みを両腕で交互に持ち替えていた。シャーロットは走らないと彼についていけなかった。

be in the lead「先頭に立つ」

20

It always takes time, in my experience, before a journey truly begins.

私の経験では、旅が本当に始まるまでには時間がかかる。

The actual leave-taking, waving goodbye, starting up and so forth is all a confusion, a conflict of different happenings.

実際の別れ、手を振ってさよならをする、出発などはすべて混乱、すなわち様々な出来事のぶつかり合いである。

Only later on, when the journey is really under way, does it actually start. ‘Well, off at last’ mutters the traveler to himself or any companion close by. The journey has begun.

後になって旅が本当に進み出して初めて実際に始まる。「ああ、とうとう出かけたんだ」と旅人が自分自身か近くにいる道連れにつぶやく。旅が始まったのだ。

21

He was having a nightmare.

彼は悪夢を見ていた。

He was going down a steep, icy slope on skis and below him there was a deep dark gully.

険しい凍りついた坂をスキーで下っていたところ、下には深く暗い谷があった。

The wind was screaming past his ears, and his speed became greater and greater as he neared the gully.

風が耳元でピューピューと吹き過ぎ、谷に近づくにつれて速度がだんだん速くなった。

He tried to stop, but he knew it was impossible on that ice.

止まろうとしたがそんな氷上では無理だと分かった。

He screamed, but the wind took the sound out of his mouth.

彼は悲鳴を上げたが、風はその声をかき消した。

 

He knew he was going to crash and he knew it was going to be bad and he resigned himself to how bad it was going to be.

自分が墜落しかかっていることが分かり、事態が酷くなることも分かると、彼は諦めてどれほど酷くなるにしても受け入れることにした。

22

Our earthly time allowance has rapidly shot up from an average of forty years to an average of seventy years plus within the experience of all the old people alive at present.

我々の寿命は平均40年から70年以上まで急激に上昇し、それを現在存命中の高齢者がみんな経験している。

Nothing comparable to it has been known before.

今まで知られているところではこれに匹敵することは何もない。

Although it was accepted that the body had been programmed to last for the classic three-score-years-and-ten, until now there was an all too eloquent proof that very few bodies ever did, and for a man to ‘see his time out,’ as they used to say, was exceptional.

身体は古来言われた70年まで持ちこたえるように仕組まれていたと認められていたが、そのような身体はほとんどなかったことをあまりにも雄弁に物語る証拠があり、人が昔風に言って「天誅を全うする」ことは例外的であった。

23

TV is more suitable for family entertainment than the radio, precisely because it makes so few demands, leaving one with plenty of attention to give to the noisy grandchild or talkative aunt.

テレビがラジオよりも家庭の娯楽に適しているのは、テレビの要求がほんのわずかしかなく、存分にうるさい孫やおしゃべりの叔母さんの相手をしてやれるからに尽きる。

If the programs required greater concentration, one would resent the distractions which inevitably attend the family circle.

もし番組がもっと注意の集中を求めるなら、家庭の内部にどうしても訪れる騒々しさを腹立たしく思うだろう。それゆえ、

The less demanding the program, therefore, the more outgoing and sociable everyone is, which makes for a better time for all concerned.

番組の要求が少なければ少ないほど誰もが外向的で社交的になり、そのことが関係者全員にとってより楽しい時間を過ごす助けとなる。

 

 

24

I tried to visit my neighborhood zoo one afternoon but found it closed for renovations.

ある日の午後、近くの動物園を訪れようとしたが、改装のために閉まっていた。

As I turned and headed back toward home, I was thinking only of the old black rhino, wondering whether he’d be back when the zoo was re-opened.

振り向いて家に戻りながら私は年老いたサイのことだけを考えていた。動物園が再開したら戻ってくるのかどうかと。

Judging from my numerous visits, he was never a very big draw, being, I suppose, entirely too inactive to look at for long.

何度も訪れた経験から判断すると、あのサイは大の人気者では決してなかったし、全く動かないため長い間見ていられなかった。

And yet I found him the most attractive, the most challenging to draw near to for that.

しかし私には一番の魅力で、動かないために近くに来るようにと一番挑発してくるものだった。

He is the most challenging to draw near to (him) for that./The river is the most dangerous to swim in (the river) in July.

25

It was one of those Saturdays upon which she had had to work at her office.

その日は彼女が出勤すべき土曜日のうちの一日だった。

What was worse, it was a wet Saturday: all the possibilities of fine Saturday afternoons fled from her, as she came home, steaming, in the bus, which smelt of people’s rainproofs and wet skin and hair.

さらに悪いことに、雨の土曜日だった。帰宅途中、晴れた土曜日の昼下がりにできそうなことはすべて逃げ去り、人々の雨具や濡れた肌と髪の匂いが漂うバスの中で汗だくになっていた。

To add to this it was a wet Saturday in summer, that dreariest of all occasions, when the greenness of the season calls the people of London out, even into their suburban parks, and the weather forbids.

これに加えて、夏の雨の土曜日で、例の一番つまらない出来事、緑の季節がロンドンの人々を外に、さらに郊外の公園へ誘おうとしているのに天気がそうさせないという日だった。

weather permitting (permit ⇔ forbid)

26

Some people are so changed by their life’s experience that in old age they behave in completely unexpected ways.

人生経験によって人ががらりと変わってしまい高齢になって全く意外な行動に出る人がいる。

Many of us know elderly men and women who no longer act as we have come to expect them to act.

我々の多くは予想した通りには行動してくれないおじいさん、おばあさんを知っている。

I am not talking here about victims of senile dementia.

私がここで言っているのは老年性認知症を患っている人のことではない。

In the examples I am talking of the person continues to behave in what most people would agree is a normal manner, but one so remote from his old self that he appears, to those who know him, to be someone else entirely.

今話題にしている例では、その人はたいていの人なら正常だと認める振る舞いであるが、以前のその人と余りにも違っているために知人には全く別人に見えるような振る舞いを続ける。

27

John Fenton, manager of a 7,000-acre estate in Humberside, is working with a Danish combine harvester manufacturer, Dronningbourg, on a method of using computers to map levels of fertility in different parts of a field.

ジョン・フェントンはハンバーサイド州の7千エーカーある不動産の管理者で、デンマークのコンバイン製造業者ドロニンブルグと共同し、コンピュータを使って畑のあちこちの肥沃度を図面化する方法を開発している。

The aim is to make labor, chemicals and machinery work together more effectively.

その目的は労働と農薬、機械のより効果的な共同作業を生みだすことである。

It never occurs to most of us that a field of wheat is anything but a uniform whole.

小麦畑が全面均一では決してないとは我々の大半は思いもしない。

But the crop produced in one part of a field can be three times that of another.

しかし、畑の一部でとれた収穫量が他の部分の3倍になることもある。

28

It is said of the British that, when two people meet, their opening exchange is about the weather.

イギリス人は2人が出会うとまず天気を話題にすると言われている。

This can be interpreted as a result of Britain’s changeable climate.

これは、イギリスの代わりやすい天気の結果だと解釈できる。

After all, it would be meaningless for two Egyptians meeting in July to say “Another sunny day, then,” while in Britain it is at least reasonable to express some surprise.

つまり、2人のエジプト人が7月に出会って「また今日も晴れだね」と言うのはナンセンスだが、イギリスでは驚きの気持ちをある程度示すのは少なくとももっともである。

Such opening remarks may also reflect a certain self-restraint or even politeness since they allow either party to depart after a sentence or two if they are in a hurry.

そのような会話の始め方は一種の節度、さらには丁重さも反映しているかもしれない。双方とも急いでいる場合には一言二言で別れられるからである。

29

When chicks are reared together, fighting develops about the fourth week of age.

ヒヨコを一緒に育てると4週目あたりから喧嘩が始まる。

When they are about ten to twelve weeks old, the weaker or less determined chicks have learned to avoid the stronger or fiercer, and all of them can be arranged in a straight rank order, from the most dominant to the most submissive.

生後10~12週くらいになると、ヒヨコの中で弱かったり気力の劣る方は強かったり気が荒い方を避けるようになり、ヒヨコ全体を序列の順に最も優勢なものから最も従属的なものまで一列に並べることができる。

But this does not imply the presence of social classes.

しかしだからと言って、社会階級が存在することにはならない。

Each individual may have superiors and subordinates, but in such a ranking system any line we draw, to divide an upper from a lower class, may be entirely arbitrary.

それぞれの個体が優位者と劣位者を持つにしても、そのような序列方式では上位階級と下位階級を分けるためにどんな線を引いても全く恣意的になるだろう。

30

Even before France’s Prime Minister, Edith Cresson, declared the Japanese relentless “economic animals” seeking to “dominate the world” with their workaholic habits, a half-hearted campaign began here to convince the country to relax.

フランスのエディット・クレッソン首相が日本人を、仕事中毒という習性により「世界を支配し」ようとしている情け容赦のない「エコノミック・アニマル」だと公言する前でさえ、当地では気楽にやろうと全国に呼びかける運動があまり盛り上がらない形で始まっていた。

To a younger generation that questions the merits of working 9-to-9 and then drinking with colleagues until the last train home, the new push for shorter hours and longer vacations is welcome.

9時から9時まで働き、それから同僚と飲んで終電で帰宅することに疑問をもつ若い世代にとって、時短と休日の増加を求める新たな攻勢は歓迎である。

To many over 50 it is evidence that the tough stuff that made Japan a great competitor is lost.

50を超える多くの人には、それは日本を強力な競争相手にした逞しさが失われた証拠である。

 

 

 

31

Language, when it is used to convey information about facts, is always an abbreviation for a richer conceptualization.

言語は、事実に関する情報を伝えるために使われる場合、常により豊かな概念を簡略したものである。

We know more about objects, events and people than we are ever fully able to express in words.

我々は物体や出来事、人物について言語ではすべて表現しきれないほど多くのことを知っている。

Consider the difficulty of saying all you know about the familiar face of a friend.

友人の馴染みのある顔について知っていることをすべて言うのがいかに難しいかを考えよう。

The fact is that your best effort would probably fail to convey enough information to enable someone else to single out your friend in a large crowd.

実はどんなに努力しても、おそらく誰か他の人に大群衆の中にいる友人を見つけ出せるほど情報を伝えられないだろう。

This simply illustrates the fact that you know more than you are able to say.

このことが端的に示すように、言葉では言えないほど多くのことを知っている。

32

Most boys have a natural inclination to admire their fathers, and a cultural gap between father and son is painful for both.

男の子はたいてい生まれつき父親に憧れる傾向があるため、父子間の文化的な溝はいずれにとっても痛ましい。

The middle-class father who at nights studies the encyclopedia in order to be able to answer his son’s questions makes us smile a little, but we ought to admire him.

中流家庭の父親が息子の質問に答えられるように夜ごと百科事典を勉強するのはやや微笑ましいが、我々はこの父親に憧れるのは当然である。

For such fathers this may be an introduction to lifelong education.

このような父親にとってこのことが生涯教育への入口にかもしれない。

In an environment which values knowledge for its own sake he will not put down the encyclopedia with a sigh of relief when the son has grown up, but will want more of it.

知識を知識として尊重する環境では、父親は息子が大人になったときほっとため息をついて百科事典を置くのではなく、さらに知識を得たいと思うようになる。

 

 

33

There were a lot of people today who demand that men of science should devote themselves to the pursuit of discoveries that can immediately be turned to account.

今日、科学者は直ちに利用できる発明の追求に専念すべきだと要求する人が多い。

To my mind, however, there could be no surer way of rendering the future completely barren, since nearly all great technological advances depend upon discoveries so unexpected as to be unplannable.

しかし、私の考えでは、それ以上未来を確実にすっかり駄目にしてしまう方法はない。なぜなら、技術的な大進歩は予定できないほど意外な発見に依拠しているからである。

Nature in her own time reveals her secrets to the patient questioner, and the plain fact is that nature is infinitely cleverer than man.

自然は自ら決めた時期に我慢強く疑問を追求した人に秘密を漏らし、また明らかに自然は人間より果てし無く賢明である。

Pure science, therefore, cannot be dismissed as a polite amusement.

それゆえ純粋科学を上品な娯楽と片付けることはできない。

34

To converse well, either with another person or with a crowd, it is vitally necessary to feel relaxed and comfortably at ease.

一人または多数とうまく対話するためには、寛いで気分よく楽にしていることが不可欠である。

Many intelligent people have thought themselves slow and dull because they could not produce witty remarks in rapid succession as their companions seemed able to do.

多くの知的な人が、友人たちがやっているような気の利いた発言を矢継ぎ早にできないために自分は鈍く愚かだと思ってきた。

This is often because of a pang of embarrassment or self-consciousness, which is akin to stage fright.

これは恥ずかしさや自意識過剰でドキドキするためであり、「上がる」のに似ている。

Feeling a little uncomfortable and ill at ease in the presence of others, one finds his mind won’t work right.

人前で少し落ち着かず不安になると頭が適切に動かなくなる。

It simply refuses to come up with the bright remark or the lively comeback that would have found so beautiful a place in the conversation.

そんな頭では、思いついていれば会話中に見事に決まった素晴らしい発言や鮮やかな返答はどうしても出てこない。

35

From the late eighteenth century onwards, the progress of the Industrial Revolution signaled the end of Britain as a nation of countrymen, and perhaps helped to implant in folk memory the comforting myth of a lost world in which mankind lived in closer harmony with nature, or the fond dream of somehow returning to find one’s roots in ruralism.

19世紀末からずっと、産業革命の進行により農民の国としてのイギリスに終焉を告げたが、人類が自然とより調和して暮らしていた失われた世界があるという心休まる神話や、どうにか回帰して自分の根源を農耕生活に見出したいという甘い夢を民衆の記憶に植えつけるのに役立ったかもしれない。

The greater the spread of the terrace and the factory, the office and the suburb, the more the realities of the countryside receded, until a life governed by unceasing labor and the uncertainties of the weather was transformed into a dreamland of health and happiness.

住宅や工場、職場や郊外が広がるほどますます農村地帯の現実は後退し、ついには休みのない労働と当てにならない天候に支配された生活が健康で幸福な夢の世界へと変わった。

36

We always assume that an interest in the beauty of Nature is a sign of goodness in a person.

我々は常に自然美への関心が人の善良な印であると思い込んでいる。

It is a strange assumption we make and neither do we understand why, generally speaking, we consider Nature to be beautiful.

それは奇妙な思い込みであり、一般的に言って、我々がなぜ自然を美しいと考えるのかも分からない。

Man is more apt to see beauty in symmetry and ugliness in disorder.

人間はどちらかというと均整なものを美しいと感じ、乱雑なものを醜いと感じる傾向がある。

Nature, superficially at least, appears to be disorderly.

自然は少なくとも表面的には乱雑に見える。

Left alone with Nature, man starts to rearrange what he finds there.

自然の中に一人残されると、人間はそこで見るものを再構成し始める。

He proceeds quite often with some principle of equation in his mind.

極めて頻繁に何らかの均等原理を念頭に置いて進める。

 

 

He is driven by the notion that if he puts something on one side of anything, he ought to put another thing just like it on the other side.

どんなものでも一方の側に何かを置くならば、どうしてもその反対側にもう一つ別のよく似たものを置かないといけないと考えてしまう。

Then he calls it beautiful.

そしてそれを美しいと称するのである。

37

He had crossed the main road one morning and was descending a short street when Kate Caldwell came out of a narrow side street in front of him and walked toward school, her schoolbag bumping at her hip.

ある朝、彼が大通りを渡って短い通りを下っていると、ケイト・コールドウェルが目の前の狭い脇道から出てきて通学カバンを腰の辺りにぶつけながら学校へ向かって歩いていた。

He followed excitedly, meaning to overtake but lacking the courage.

彼はわくわくしながら後をついていき、追いつこうとしたがその勇気が萎えてしまった。

What could he say to her?

何と言ったらいいのだろう。

He imagined his stammering voice saying dull, awkward things about lessons and the weather and could only imagine her saying conventional things in response.

自分がもごもごした声で授業がどうの、天気がどうのとつまらない要領を得ないことを話している姿を想像したが、彼女が型通りの返事をしている姿しか想像できなかった。

Why didn’t she turn and smile and call to him, saying, “Don’t you like my company?”

どうしてこの子は振り向いて微笑み、「一緒に行くのは嫌?」と言ってくれないのか。

If she did, he would smile faintly and approach with eyebrows questioningly raised.

そうしてくれたら、ちょっと微笑んで問いかけるように眉を上げて近づいていくのに。

But she did nothing. She made not even the merest gesture.

ところがあの子は何もしなかった。そんな素振りは一切しなかった。

38

Gandhi had a prolonged formal education, finally qualifying as a lawyer, but he received little formal instruction in those questions with which he became increasingly concerned, questions of moral and political philosophy, and of religion.

ガンジーは長期の正式な教育を受け、ついに法曹資格を得たが、ますます関心をもつようになった問題、道徳哲学、政治哲学および宗教に関する諸問題の正式な教育はほとんど受けなかった。

It was imprisonment that provided Gandhi with one of the best opportunities for further reading.

ガンジーにさらに読書をするように最高の機会の一つを提供したのは投獄だった。

Indeed, for those entering the nationalist movement in the 1920s, prison was in a sense the nearest they came to going to a university.

実際1920年代に独立運動に参加した人にとって、ある意味、大学に通うのと最も近いのが投獄だった。

Gandhi was clearly widely read.

ガンジーは明らかに幅広い知識があった。

Certainly no other influential Indian intellectual was as familiar as Gandhi was with the religious and philosophical texts of the classical Indian tradition as well as the writings of daring Western moralists of the nineteenth century.

確かにガンジーほど19世西欧の果敢な道徳家の著作だけでなく宗教や哲学に関するインドの古典的伝統文献にまで精通しているインド人の有力知識人は一人もいなかった。

39

Indeed, in the year 1000 there was no concept of an antiseptic at all.

実は、1000年の時点では消毒剤という概念が全くなかった。

If a piece of food fell off your plate, the advice of one contemporary document was to pick it up, make the sign of the cross over it, salt it well ―― and then eat it.

食べ物が一つ皿からこぼれても、当時の文書によれば、それを拾ってその上で十字を切りよく塩をつけて食べればよいということだった。

The sign of the cross was, so to speak, the antiseptic of the year 1000.

十字を切るのはいわば1000年当時の消毒剤だった。

The person who dropped his food on the floor knew that he was taking some sort of risk when he picked it up and put it in his mouth, but he trusted in his faith.

食べ物を床に落とした人はそれを拾って口に入れるにはある程度危険を伴うことを知っていたが、自分の信仰に従った。

Today we have faith in modern medicine, though few of us can claim much personal knowledge of how it actually works.

今日我々は現代医学を信じている。現代医学が実際にどのように作用するかを肌身で知っていると言い張れる人はほとんどいないが。

We also know that the ability to combat quite major illness can be affected by what we call “a positive state of mind” ―― what the Middle Ages experienced as “faith.”

また我々はかなりの重病と闘う能力がいわゆる「前向きの心理状態」すなわち中世が「信仰」という形で経験したものに影響されうることも知っている。

40

Merely stating a proposal by no means requires listeners to accept it.

単に提案を述べただけでは決して聞き手が受け入れる必要はない。

If you say, “We should spend money on highway construction,” all you have done is to assert that such a step should be taken.

「幹線道路の建設にお金を使った方がよい」と言っても、単にそのような対策をとるべきだと主張したにすぎない。

From the audience’s point of view, you have only raised the question, “Why should we?”

聞き手側からすれば、「なぜそうすべきか」という疑問が提起されただけである。

No person in that audience has any reason to believe that the proposal is good simply because you have voiced it.

単にそういう発言があったというだけのためにその提案がよいものだと信じる理由は聞き手の誰にも全くない。

If, however, you are able to say, “Because…” and list several reasons why each of your listeners should honestly make the same statement, you are likely to succeed in proving your point.

しかし、「なぜなら・・・」と言ってそれぞれの聞き手がまさしく同じ発言をすべき理由をいくつか挙げることができるなら、自分の主張をうまく立証できる可能性がある。

You have achieved your purpose when your audience would, if asked, lean towards agreement on the importance of highway spending.

聞き手がどうかと尋ねられれば幹線道路への支出の重要性を認める同意へ傾くならば、目的を達成したことになる。

41

Early in January my wife and I set out for Rome.

1月初め、妻と私はローマへ向けて出発した。

My affections are still so deeply attached to the Italy I discovered then ―― for the few months I had spent in it twenty three years before had told me little or nothing ―― that if I were to write at length about it now, gratitude would make me say too much, or dread of appearing extravagant tempt me to say too little.

私の愛情は今でも深く当時発見したイタリアに引きつけられている。というのも、私が23年前にそこで過ごした数ヶ月は私にほとんど何も語りかけなかったからである。そのため仮に今私がイタリアについて長々と書くとするなら、感謝の気持ちから饒舌になるか、またははしゃぎすぎに見えることを恐れるためあまりにも言葉少なくなるだろう。

Perhaps the fact that Rome made my wife well again and let me forget Prague was enough to account for part of the gratitude.

ローマに来たお蔭で妻が元気を取り戻し、私もプラハのことを忘れたということだけでも感謝を表すのに十分だったかもしれない。

Perhaps the warmth of Italian life after the chills of Prague intoxicated us both a little at first.

プラハの寒さの後で過ごした暖かいイタリアでの暮らしのせいで我々は最初少し舞い上がっていたかもしれない。

 

 

But it was the gradual revelation of Italy during the next year and a half which came to mean so much to us.

しかし、我々にとって大きな意味をもつようになったのは、その後の1年半の間にイタリアが次第に姿を表したことだった。

We did not idealize our Italian friends; we had instead the pleasure of being able to take them as they were.

我々はイタリア人の友人を理想化したわけではなく、ありのままに受け取れるのが楽しかったのである。

42

We are prisoners of the sense we have about the world because of our size, and rarely recognize how different the world must appear to small animals.

我々は自分の体の大きさのせいで周囲の世界に対して感じる感覚の虜になっているため、小動物にとって世界がどのように違って見えざるをえないかにめったに気づかない。

Since our relative surface area is so small at our large size, we are ruled by the forces of gravity acting upon our weight.

我々は、相対的な表面積が体の大きさに対して極めて小さいため、体重にかかる重力に支配されている。

But gravity means next to nothing to very small animals with high surface to volume ratios; they live in a world of surface forces and judge the pleasures and dangers of their surroundings in ways foreign to our experience.

しかし、体積当たりの表面積の比率が大きい非常に小さな動物にとって重力はほとんど意味をもたない。そういう動物は表面に働く力の世界で暮らし、自分の環境の快適さや危険性を我々の経験しない方法で判断する。

An insect performs no miracle in walking up a wall or upon the surface of a pond: the small force of gravity pulling it down or under is easily overcome by surface forces which act to keep it in position.

昆虫が壁を上ったり、池の表面を歩いたりするのは奇跡でも何でもない。下方や水面下に引っ張る重力が小さいために容易に表面に働く力が上回り、適正な位置を保つのである。

Throw an insect off the roof and it floats gently down as the forces of friction from the air acting upon its surface overcome the weak influence of gravity.

昆虫を屋根から投げれば、昆虫は浮遊したままゆっくり落ちていく。表面に働く空気抵抗が重力のわずかな影響に勝るからである。

 

43

Fred and Ann were driving on the expressway to Minneapolis for Ann’s health check-up.

フレッドとアンは、アンが健康診断を受けるためミネアポリスへ向けて高速道路を走っていた。

She was worried that she might have cancer, having read a lot about the disease in the newspaper, although the doctor in their hometown had told her she was all right.

アンは新聞でガンの記事をたくさん読んだために自分がガンかもしれないと心配になった。地元の医師は大丈夫だと言ってくれたのに。

It was cold and raining, the traffic was terrible, huge trailers roared past them.

寒く雨が降り、渋滞は酷く、巨大なトレーラーが轟音をたてて追い越した。

Fred said, “If it was up to me, I’d just as soon turn around and go home.”

フレッドが「僕の判断に任せてくれるなら、Uターンして家に帰る方がいいな」と言った。

It was the wrong thing to say, with Ann in the mood she was in.

それは、アンの気持ちからすれば言ってはならないことだった。

But she had been expecting him to say it and had prepared a speech in her mind in case he did.

しかしアンはフレッドがそう言うだろうと予想し、言ったときのために心の中で何を言うかを準備していた。

“Well, of course. I’m sure you would rather turn around.

「そうね、当然だわ。きっと引き返したいのね。

You don’t care.

どうでもいいのね。

You don’t care one tiny bit, and you never have, so I’m not surprised you don’t now.

これっぽっちも気にならないのね。いつだってそうだったわ。今もそうでも驚かないわ。

You don’t care if I live or die.”

私が生きようと死のうとどうでもいいのね。」

44

I remember spending some time on the lakes of Minnesota when I was younger.

もっと若かった頃、私はミネソタの湖畔でしばらく過ごしたことを覚えている。

It was perfectly obvious there that some people engaged in fishing acted as if their whole life depended on catching fish.

そこでは紛れもなく明らかに、全人生が魚釣りにかかっているかのように釣りをする人たちがいた。

They would motor up and down the lake trolling for long hours, really working at it.

モーターボートで湖を行き来し、長時間流し釣りをして本当に勤しんでいた。

They worked at their leisure.

余暇に勤しんでいたのである。

Then there were other people who did not really much care whether they caught fish.

それから魚が釣れるかどうか実はあまり気にしない人もいた。

It was not that they went fishing without any care for catching fish, but they would just as soon catch them and put them back.

魚を釣れるかどうか全く気にせずに釣りに行くというのではなく、釣っても放してやりたかった。

Notice the difference between these two ―― there is not any objective difference between their ways of fishing.

この2つのタイプの違いに注意しよう。客観的には釣り方に違いが全くない。

It is a fundamental difference in the way in which people learn to relate to what they are doing.

人が自分の行動にどのように関わるかに関する根本的な違いである。

Only the latter of these two characterizations I have given you is one that fits the notion of leisure.

私が挙げたこの2つの特徴のうち、余暇という概念に合うのは後者だけだ。

Such persons may let time pass.

そういう人は時が過ぎるに任せるだろう。

Indeed time is not a factor to such people.

確かに時間はそういう人には要素にならない。

44

Some people will find the hand of God behind everything that happens.

あらゆる出来事の背後に神の手を見出す人もいる。

I visit a woman in the hospital whose car was run into by a drunken driver driving through a red light.

私は飲酒運転の車に赤信号でぶつけられた女性を病院に見舞う。

Her vehicle was totally destroyed, but miraculously she escaped with only a broken ankle.

その女性の車は大破したが、奇跡的に足首を折っただけで助かった。

She looks up at me from her hospital bed and says, ‘Now I know there is a God.

病院のベッドから私を見上げ、「今は神がいるのが分かります。

If I could come out of that alive and in one piece, it must be because He is watching over me up there.’

もし私があの事故から無傷で生還できるとしたら、神が天から私を見守っているからです。」

 

 

I smile and keep quiet, running the risk of letting her think that I agree with her ―― though I don’t exactly.

私は微笑み、何も言わないから、私が彼女に同意していると負わせる危険を冒していることになる。私はそうは思わないのだが。

My mind goes back to a funeral I conducted two weeks earlier, for a young husband and father who died in a similar drunk-driver collision.

私の頭の中には2週間前に私が執り行った葬儀がよみがえる。妻子のある若い人で同じように飲酒運転の衝突事故で亡くなった人の葬儀だった。

The woman before me may believe that she is alive because God wanted her to survive, and I am not inclined to talk her out of it, but what would she or I say to that other family?

目の前の女性は、自分が生きているのは神が生き延びるように望んだからだと信じているだろう。私はそうではないと女性を説得しようとは思わないが、彼女にしても私にしてもそうではない家族には何と言うのだろうか。

45

I was wondering how on earth I was going to get through the evening.

その夜を一体どのようにして過ごすことになるのかと疑問だった。

Saturday. Saturday night and I was left alone with my grandmother.

土曜日。土曜の夜で私は祖母と二人きりだっだ。

The others had gone ―― my mother and my sister, both dating.

他の家族は出て行った。母も姉もデートに出かけた。

Of course, I would have gone, too, if I had been able to get away first.

もちろん私も最初に逃げ出せていれば出かけていた。

Then I would not have had to think about the old woman, going through the routines that she would fill her evening with.

そうすれば、夜中ずっとしている日課をこなしている祖母のことを考えなくて済んだ。

I would have slipped away and left my mother and my sister to argue, not with each other but with my grandmother, each separately conducting a running battle as they prepared for the night out.

私が抜け出して母と姉が言い争いをするままにしただろう。お互いにではなく祖母との間で。それぞれが一晩遊び明かす準備をしながら長々と言い争いを続けるのだ。

One of them would lose and the loser would stay at home, angry and frustrated at being in on a Saturday night, the one night of all the week for pleasure.

いずれか一人が負けて、負けた方が土曜の夜に家にいることに腹を立て欲求不満になりながら家に残るのである。一週間で唯一楽しい夜なのに。

Well, some chance of pleasure.

いや、楽しみの可能性である。

There was hardly ever any real fulfillment of hopes but at least the act of going out brought with it a possibility and that was something to fight for.

希望が本当に叶うことはほとんどなかったが、少なくとも出かける行為により可能性はあったのであり、それは闘って得たいと思うものだった。

“Where are you going?” my grandmother would demand of her daughter, forty-six and a widow for thirteen years.

「どこへ行くつもり?」と祖母は46歳、未亡人になって13年の母に問いただしたものだ。

“I’m going out.”

「家の外へ。」

My mother’s reply would be calm and she would look determined as I imagine she had done at sixteen, and always would do.

母の返事は穏やかで、私が今想像すると母が16歳の時のように、またいつもそうだったように表情が断固としていた。

46

The nature and function of medicine has gradually changed over the past century.

医学の本質と機能は過去1世紀にわたって徐々に変化した。

What was once a largely communicative activity aimed at looking after the sick has become a technical enterprise able to treat them with increasing success.

かつて病人の看護を狙いとして概ね心を通わす活動だったものが、病人の治療をますます成功に導く技術的な活動になった。

While few would want to give up these technical advances and go back to the past, medicine’s traditional caring functions have been left behind as the practices of curing have become more established, and it is criticized now for losing the human touch that made it so helpful to patients even before it knew how to cure them.

このような技術の進歩を手放して過去に戻りたいという人はほとんどいないだろうが、医療の伝統的な看護機能は、治療業務がいっそう確立するにつれて置き去りにされてしまい、医療は患者を治療する方法が分からないうちにも患者に大きく貢献した人間的な触れ合いをいまや失っていると批判されている。

 

The issue looks simple: human communication versus technique.

問題は簡単に見える。人間的な心の交流と技術の対立である。

However, we all know that in medicine it is never easy to separate the two.

しかし、我々はみんな医療上その2つを分離することは決して容易ではないと知っている。

Research on medical practice shows that a patient’s physical condition is often affected by the quality of communication between the doctor and the patient.

医療業務に関する研究によると、患者の身体的条件はよく医師と患者の間の交流の質に影響を受ける。

Even such an elementary form of consideration for the patient as explaining the likely effects of a treatment can have an impact on the outcome.

治療により生じうる結果を説明するというような患者への初歩的な配慮でさえ結果に影響を与えかねない。

We are also aware that in the cases where medicine still does not offer effective cures the need for old-style care is particularly strong.

医療が効果的な治療をいまだに提供できない場合には、旧来の看護の必要性が特に大きいことも我々は知っている。

Hence it is important to remember the communicative dimension of modern medicine.

それゆえ、現代医療の心の触れ合いという側面を弁えておくことが重要である。

47

Why is the Mona Lisa the best-known painting in the entire world?

なぜモナリザは全世界で最も有名な絵画なのか。

A simple glimpse at even some of her features ―― her silhouette, her eyes, perhaps just her hands ―― brings instant recognition even to those who have no taste or passion for painting.

彼女の容姿のいくつか(輪郭、目、ひょっとすると手だけでも)を一目見ただけでも、絵画に対して何の興味も愛情もない人でさえすぐモナリザだと分かる。

Its commercial use in advertising far exceeds that of any other work of art.

広告として商業的に使われているという点では他の芸術作品を遥かに凌いでいる。

There are works of art that appear to be universal, in the sense that they are still loved and enjoyed centuries after their production.

制作後数世紀経っても依然として愛され楽しまれているという意味で、普遍的に見える芸術作品がある。

They awake instant recognition in millions throughout the world.

そのような作品は世界中の何百万人の人々がすぐにそれと分かる。

They speak not only to their own time ―― the relatively small audience for whom they were originally produced ―― but to worlds beyond, to future generations, to a mass society connected by international communications that their creators could not suspect would ever come into being.

その作品が制作された時代、すなわち元来制作の対象であった比較的少数の愛好家だけでなく、それを超える世界、未来の世代、制作者が出現するとは思いもしなかった国際通信によって結ばれた大衆社会にも語りかける。

It is precisely because such universal appeal cannot be separated from the system which makes them famous that one should question the idea that the success of artistic works lies within the works themselves.

芸術作品の成功は作品そのものにあるという考えに疑問をもつのが当然なのは、まさしくこのような普遍的な魅力が作品を有名にする仕組みとは切っても切れないからである。

The Western origin of so many masterpieces suggests that they need, for their global development, appropriate political, ideological and technological support.

これほど多くの傑作が西洋から生まれたことから、それらが地球全体に行き渡るには適切な政治的・思想的・技術的支援が必要であることが分かる。

Mozart was, we know, greatly appreciated in his lifetime, but only in Europe.

モーツァルトが生前から高く評価されていたことは知られているが、それはヨーロッパに限られていた。

He would not be as widely known as he is today throughout the world without the invention of recording equipment, film music, and plays and films about his life.

録音装置や映画音楽、その生涯を描いた演劇や映画が作られなかったら、今日ほど世界中に広く知られていないだろう。

Mozart would not be ‘Mozart,’ the great universal artist, without adequate technical and marketing support.

それだけの技術上、商業販売上の支援がなければ、モーツァルトは偉大な普遍的芸術家「モーツァルト」ではないだろう。

 

 

 

 

Follow me!

コメントを残す

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です